Seeking help from living humans regarding those things that they are able to do

Question: A righteous scholar told us: “Awliyaa’ (pious people) fulfill the needs of people who invoke them instead of Allaah”. To support his view, he quoted the following Hadeeth in which the Messenger of Allaah (peace be upon him) said: Allaah has some servants to whom people will turn for fulfilling their needs. Such are those who will be safe (from the torment) on the Day of Resurrection.

Answer: Seeking help from a live person who is present and can fulfill a need is permissible like asking someone to lend you some money or seeking his help to restore one of your lost rights or to remove something wrong that was done to you… read more here.

Seeking the help of the prophets and Awliyaa’

Question: Two groups holding opposing views: the first group maintains that seeking help from prophets and Awliyaa’ (pious people) constitutes Kufr (disbelief) and Shirk (associating others with Allaah in His Divinity or worship); they give evidence from Qur’aan and Sunnah (whatever is reported from the Prophet) in support of their view. The second group maintains that seeking help from prophets and Awliyaa’ is permissible because they are the chosen, sincere Servants of Allaah (Exalted be He). Which of the two is correct?

Answer: Asking anyone other than Allaah for help, to bring healing, to make it rain, to prolong one’s life, or similar requests that lie in the Power of Allaah Alone is a form of major Shirk (associating others with Allah in His Divinity or worship that takes a Muslim out of Islam)… read more here.

Seeking help from the dead who were known to be pious

Question: A pious man died in India and was buried in a town called Aghmiz. Is it permissible to seek his aid? Does he truly help anyone who seeks his help and turns down no one?

Answer: The answer to this is the same as the fifth question, as seeking help from the dead is Shirk (associating others with Allaah in His Divinity or worship)… read more here.

Invoking the dead and appealing to them for help when visiting their graves

Question 267:  Some people invoke the dead when visiting the graves of Al-Baqee` and ‘Uhud and throw money there for their sake. What is the ruling on this practice?

Answer: Invoking the dead and appealing to them for help when visiting their graves is regarded as a form of major Shirk (associating others with Allaah in His Divinity or worship that takes the Muslim out of Islaam) which draws a person out of the religion of Islaam. This is because supplication is the highest kind of all acts of worship. Allaah (Exalted be He) says, And whoever invokes (or worships), besides Allaah, any other ilaah (god), of whom he has no proof; then his reckoning is only with his Lord. Surely! Al-Kaafiroon (the disbelievers in Allaah and in the Oneness of Allaah, polytheists, pagans, idolaters) will not be successful. Also, throwing money on the graves of the dead and offering sacrifices for their sake are the worst types of major Shirk... read more here.

Ruling on seeking help from the dead

Question 266:  What is the ruling on people who put some money as charity in vow boxes that are placed inside the domed sepulchers of some righteous dead people, or seek blessings from the graves, or from the buried people through sprinkling musk, or circumambulate the graves to obtain blessings from them? Also, while the music is being played, some people sing poems with words such as: “Give me strength, O Shaykh `Abdul-Raheem” or “Give me strength, O Shaykh Ibraaheem”?

Answer: Tabarruk (seeking blessings) from the dead is an act of major Shirk (associating others with Allaah in His Divinity or worship that takes the Muslim out of Islaam), and a path to Shirk if it is intended as means for obtaining blessings from Allaah (Exalted be He). 

Likewise, making a vow to the dead is an act of major Shirk. Vowing is an act of `Ibaadah (worship); therefore, anyone who dedicates it to any other than Allaah (Exalted be He) is considered a Mushrik (one who associates others with Allaah in His Divinity or worship). Also, it is not permissible to offer Salaah (Prayer) behind an Imam (the one who leads congregational Prayer) who asks for blessings from the graves, makes vows or offers sacrifices to them, or seek the help of those buried in them. Such a person is a Mushrik.

Songs and music are Haraam (unlawful), because they are forbidden forms of amusement. If songs include words that appeal to the dead for help and provision, singing such songs is regarded as a form of major Shirk... read more here.