Relying on the calendar for determining Sawm and `Eed

Question: In India, the beginning of Ramadaan and `Eed Al-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) are determined based on the annual calendar which is issued by the Indian Parliament; namely, the beginning and the end of Ramadaan are predetermined at the beginning of the year. By the same token, `Eed Al-Ad-haa (the Festival of the Sacrifice) is also predetermined based on the annual calendar, and not based on the Day of `Arafah. Moreover, Muslims in India usually sacrifice their animals after the time other Muslims, especially in Arab states, sacrifice their animals.

Now, our question is: Concerning the fast of Ramadaan, we usually start our fast when we receive a confirmation of the beginning of Ramadaan by calling our families in Saudi Arabia, in Kuwait, or in the Gulf States in general. Our commence of the fast usually occurs before the fast of Muslims in India. Is our fast valid or invalid in this case, taking into consideration that most of the Muslim foreign students in India fast after the new moon is sighted in the Gulf states. Please provide us with a Fatwa on this matter.

Answer: You should observe the fast with Muslims in your country, and it is not permissible to have differences among the residents of the same country in this regard, due to the Prophet’s (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) saying: The beginning of Ramadaan is the day when you begin fasting, the end of Ramadaan is on the day when you end it, and ‘Eed Al-Ad-haa is on the day when you sacrifice. It is noteworthy that the legal confirmation of the beginning of the lunar month is legally established by sighting the new moon with the naked eye or by adopting the means which help the eye sight the new moon. If the new moon can not be sighted, then it is an obligation to complete the month as thirty days. For the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said… read more here.

Taking intravenous injections and ending Sawm according to a sighting place in another country

Question: A person was in Egypt at the end of Ramadaan in the year 95 A.H. At this time, Egypt followed Kuwait in announcing the time of `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) one day before Saudi Arabia and Qatar. This day became a day of `Eed in Egypt. The inquirer is asking: Should they make up for this day? They also ask whether or not intravenous injections break Sawm (fast) when they have it?

Answer: Regarding the first question about people breaking their fast in Egypt based on the establishment of the `Eed following Kuwait, knowing that the inquirer was in Egypt at that time, it seems to us that there is no harm in this act [breaking fast for `Eed in Egypt] and that they do not have to make up for this day, for they followed the ruling of the country where they were present after being certain of the beginning of the month of Shawwaal... read more here.

The difference of the timing of Muslims’ religious festivals

Question: What is the ruling on the difference of setting the beginning of Muslims’ religious festivals like `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast), and `Eed-ul-Adha (the Festival of the Sacrifice)? It is worthy to mention that this results in people fasting a day which is prohibited to fast such as the day of `Eed-ul-Fitr or breaking their fast on a day that should be observed. I need a decisive answer regarding this matter please. If Islaam rejects this difference, how can Muslim festivals be unified?

Answer: Scholars agree that the sighting of the crescent causes differences. However, they held different opinions regardingwhether the difference in sighting the moon matters or not in the beginning and the end of Ramadaan. Some Fuqahaa’ (Muslim jurists) held the opinion that the difference in sighting the moon does matter in the beginning and end of Ramadaan while others see that it does not… read more here.

Concluding the marriage contract between the two `Eeds

Question 14: I am a young man in the prime of my youth. I engaged a certain girl, and after a period of engagement, I decided to contract marriage in the period between ‘Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) and ‘Eed-ul-Adha (the Festival of the Sacrifice). However, I confronted a problem. My fiancée’s relatives rumored that it is not permissible to contract marriage during such a period. My fiance’s father asked an Imaam of a Masjid (mosque) and the answer was that it is Islaamically impermissible. I, on my part, asked another Imam who gave me a reply to the contrary.I fell into confusion. This is why I am sending to you hoping that you will give me a detailed answer substantiated by Hadeeth and Ijmaa‘ (consensus of scholars), so that I can convince my fiance’s family. In fact, I am sure that contracting marriage between the two ‘Eeds is permissible, but I have no evidence in written form.

Answer: A man may contract and consummate his marriage on any day of the year unless he is in a state of Ihraam (ritual state for Hajj and ‘Umrah). During Ihraam, it is not permissible to get married or contract marriage for oneself or for others. Prohibiting contracting marriage between ‘Eed-ul-Fitr and ‘Eid-ul-Ad-ha, or on any other day, has no Shar‘ee (Islaamic legal) grounds… read more here.

Is it permissible to say Allaahu Akbar on the two `Eed in unison?

Question 476: In the southern towns, we recite the Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) in the Masjid (mosque) on `Eed as follows: Allaahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, Allaahu Akbar, Kabeeran, wa al-hamdu lil laahi katheeran, wa Subhaana Allaahi bukratan wa aseelan, Laa Ilaahaa Illaa Allaah wahdah, Sadaq wa`dah, wa `Aza Jundah, wa Nasra `Abdah, wa Hazam Al-Ahzaba wahdah, laa ilaaha ill-Allaah, wa la N`budoo illaa-Iyah, Mukhlsin lahoo Al-Deen wa law Kariha Al-Kaafiroon, laa ilaaha ill-Allah, Allaahu Akbar, Wali-l-Laahi-l-Hamd (Allaah is the Greatest (thrice), there is no God but Allaah, and all Praise be to Allaah in abundance. Glory be to Allaah, morning and evening. He fulfilled His Promise, granted victory to His Slave and defeated the confederates Alone. We are sincere in Faith and devotion to Him, although the disbelievers detest it.) This Takbeer is recited aloud in unison until the call to commence Salaah (Prayer) is made. However, the Imaam stated that reciting Takbir in unison is impermissible and is a Bidd`ah (innovation in religion)? What is the ruling on this form of Takbeer?

Answer: Reciting Takbeer is Mashroo` (Islaamically acceptable) on the night and on the day of `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) before and after Salaah until the end of the Khutbah (sermon). It is also recommended during the first ten days of Dul-Hijjah and Days of Tashreeq (11th, 12th and 13th of Dul-Hijjah). The Sunnah is for each Muslim to recite it individually, but reciting it aloud as a group is a Bidd`ah. It was authentically narrated that the Prophet (peace be upon him) stated: Anyone who does an action which is not stated in this matter of ours (Islaam) will have it rejected...read more here.

They celebrate the `Eed through collecting a sum from each person

Question 19: Recently, a phenomenon has become widespread among some villagers, and tribal people residing in cities. They gather at clubs or rest houses on one of the days of Blessed `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast). This gathering is funded by raising money from the individuals taking part even if they do not attend the gathering. Moreover, under the terms of this gathering any delay of payment is conditional to paying in excess. Those who refuse to pay are put on the black list and boycotted; no one accept their invitations, and no help is given to them when in need. Please provide us with your Fatwaa (legal opinion issued by a qualified Muslim scholar) on this issue. May Allaah reward you with the best!

Answer: This money taken from individuals to establish a party for the Day of `Eed, gatherings, and so on, without their willingness, or consent is impermissible. The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: The property of a Muslim is unlawful (to take), unless (he gives it) willingly. In another Hadith, the Prophet (peace be upon him) said: Surely your blood, your property, and your dignity are sacred among you like the sacredness of this day of yours in this month of yours in this land of yours [i.e. Do not kill one another! Do not take others’ property without right! Do not destroy the dignity of one another!] This was the Khutbah (sermon) delivered by the Prophet (peace be upon him) on the Day of Nahr (Sacrifice, 10th of Dul-Hijjah, when pilgrims slaughter their sacrificial animals) at the Farewell Hajj (Hajj performed by the Prophet before his death). Moreover, boycotting those who did not pay is unjust read more here.

Whether reciting Takbeer in congregation is permissible or not?

Question 18: I was living at a small town in the United States of America where more than one hundred and fifty Muslims once assembled to offer Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer). A fierce battle would have erupted between them because of a dispute on whether reciting Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) in congregation is permissible. Had it not been for Allaah’s Mercy, the Muslims would have been the laughingstock of those lying in wait, including secularists and non-Muslims. The pro-impermissibility party argued that this was not the practice of the Salaf (righteous predecessors) and that the basis regarding Adhkar (invocations and remembrances said at certain times on a regular basis) and Du`a’ (supplication) is to be said individually. Moreover, there is no explicit Nas (Islamic text from the Qur’aan or the Sunnah) either in a Marfoo` (a Hadeeth narrated from the Prophet with a connected or disconnected chain of narration) or a Mawqoof (words or deeds narrated from a Companion of the Prophet that are not attributed to the Prophet) Hadeeth on reciting Takbeer in congregation. The pro-permissibility group that adopted that reciting Takbeer in congregation is Mashroo` (Islaamically prescribed) and not just permissible supported their argument using the same corps of Nas quoted by the first party while interpreting them differently:

1- Admitting that the basis regarding Du`a’ is that it should be said individually does not exclude the permissibility of saying it in congregation. An analogy should be drawn between this and congregationally saying Amen at the end of a certain form of Du`a, which is a practice consistent with the nature of Du`a’.

2- The two Hadeeths reported on Takbeer explicitly state that someone says Takbeer and the people follow suit either simultaneously or consecutively. The first narration reads: “Ibn `Umar and Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with them both) used to go out to the market place during the ten days (of Dhul-Hijjah) saying Takbeer so that they caused the people to say it as well.” (Related in Saheeh [Authentic Hadeeth Book] Al-Bukhaaree, Kitab Al-`Eedayn (Book of the Two Festivals), chapters on ‘Superiority of Good Deeds during Days of Tashriq [11th, 12th and 13th of Dhul-Hijjah]’ and ‘Reciting Takbeer during the Days of Mina’. The other narration states: “`Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) used to say Takbeer in his tent in Mina (in such a loud voice) until the people atthe Masjid (mosque) heard him and would follow him saying Takbeer. Indeed, the people at the markets of Mina also followed suit until the entire Mina would shake with Takbeer.” Moreover, women would say Takbeer following Abban ibn `Uthman and `Umar ibn `Abdul-`Azeez during the nights of Tashriq. (See Al-`Asqalany’s Fat-h-ul-Bary Vol. 2, P. 535) The proponents of this view argued that the two narrations clearly indicate that Takbeer was said in congregation for the following reasons: the wording of the statement “would follow him saying Takbeer” is used to denote doing some act congregationally as in the Hadeeth:

The Prophet (peace be upon him) used to offer Salaah (Prayer) during the night. Seeing this, people stood up to follow him in Salaah. (Related in Saheeh Al-Bukhaaree, Kitaab Al-Adaan (Book of Adaan [call to Prayer]), ‘If there is a Wall or a Sutrah [barrier placed in front of a person praying] between the Imaam and Ma’mooms [persons being led by an Imaam in Prayer]’. Another narration of the Hadeeth states: and he (peace be upon him) offered Salaah there for a few nights, and so some of his Sahaabah (Companions) followed him in Salaah.(Related in Sahih Al-Bukhaaree, Kitab Al-Adhan (Book of Adaan), ‘Night Prayer’)

Answer: First: Du`aa’ and Dikr (Remembrance of Allaah) are among the great acts of `Ibaadah (worship). In fact, acts of `Ibaadah are based on following authentic Nas rather than on innovation. The basis for Du`a’ is to be said individually and in a low voice as indicated by Ayahs (Qur’aanic verses) and authentically reported Hadeeths. To this effect, Allaah (Exalted be He) says: And offer your Salaat (prayer) neither aloud nor in a low voice, but follow a way between. It is reported that `Aishah (may Allah be pleased with her) said, “This Aayah was revealed concerning Du`a’.” (Agreed upon by Al-Bukhaaree and Muslim) Allaah (Glorified be He) also says: Invoke your Lord with humility and in secret. He likes not the aggressors. Some Mufassirs (exegetes of the Qur’aan) interpreted ‘aggressors’ to refer to those who say Du`aa’ loud read more here.

Slaughtering some cattle in `Eed-ul-Fitr in honor of the guests

Question 17: Some people used to slaughter cattle in `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) out of expressing their joy, honoring their guests, maintaining ties of kinship, bringing happiness to their neighbors and Muslim brethren, and congratulating each other with greetings such as, “May Allaah accept from you and us,” “May you be successful,” and “have a blessed `Eed.” Some claim that all this is Bid`ah (innovation in religion). They refrain from visiting or receiving relatives on the `Eed, claiming that all this is Bid`ah. Those who make this claim asked for a written Fatwaa (legal opinion issued by a qualified Muslim scholar) from Your Eminence, so that everyone can be enlightened on this matter. I Hope Your Eminence will guide us!

Answer: There is nothing wrong with slaughtering some cattle in `Eed-ul-Fitr in honor of the guests, but without extravagance and arrogance. As for congratulating Muslims with the `Eed with the statements mentioned in the question, there is nothing wrong with this; for it is Du`aa’ for Muslim brethren that Allaah may accept their deeds, prolong their lives, and bring them happiness, so there is no harm in this regard… read more here.

Slaughtering sacrificial animals for six days beginning with the day of `Eed-ul-Fitr

Question 16: What is the ruling on slaughtering sacrificial animals for six days beginning with the day of `Eed-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Breaking the Fast) as an act becoming closer to Allaah (Glorified and Exalted be He)? All the people of my village offer these sacrifices. Every home buys a sheep and slaughters it on this occasion justifying it by saying that it is an old custom established by their fathers and ancestors. Throughout the six days, each group of people, including women and children, is assigned one day to distribute the meat to the neighborhood. They slaughter their sacrificial animals and gather to eat all the meat leaving nothing at all. Was this practiced during the time of the Prophet (peace be upon him), his Sahaabah (Companions of the Prophet) or the Salaf (righteous predecessors)? Give us a Fatwaa (legal opinion issued by a qualified Muslim scholar), may Allaah reward you with the best! Am I sinful for having done this in the past before knowing your Fatwaa? If I stop doing so from now on, am I liable for any Kaffaarah (expiation)? Give us Fatwaa, may Allaah reward you with the best!

Answer:   If the case is as you mention, i.e. you customarily slaughter sacrifices thinking that they bring you closer to Allaah during `Eed-ul-Fitr, this act is a Bid`ah (innovation in religion) that you must forsake. In fact, a Muslim should not slaughter unless it is following a practice ordained by Allaah at times ordained by Allaah, such as Ud-hiyah (sacrificial animal offered by non-pilgrims) and Hady (sacrificial animal offered by pilgrims)… read more here.

Praying Salaat-ul-`Eed twice

Question 15: There are some people in our country who offer Salaat-ul-`Eed twice. This is clear in which they first pray Salaat-ul-`Eed in the Masjid (mosque) then they gather in a spacious place to pray it again (in congregation). Is this act legally permitted?

Answer:  What is authentically reported from the Prophet (peace be upon him) is that he used to pray Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer) once only, not twice. Praying it twice does not fall under the Sunnah (whatever is reported from the Prophet of acts, sayings or approvals). Moreover, this is clear when `Alee (may Allah be pleased with him) went to pray Salaat-ul-`Eed in the Musalla (place for Prayer), and appointed Aboo Mas`ood Al-Badree (may Allah be pleased with him) to lead Salaat-ul-`Eed in the Masjid as an Imam for those who are old, or unable to pray in the Musalla. Yet, `Alee (may Allaah be pleased with him) did not pray it again with those people… read more here.

Repeating the performance of Salaat-ul-`Eed in consecutive congregations in the same Musalla

Question 14: Out of necessity, we were compelled to offer Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer) more than once in one Masjid (mosque). The worshippers were more than seven thousand, a great number that is beyond the capacity of the Masjid along with its spacious courtyard. I was asked about the Sharee`ah (Islaamic law) ruling on repeating the congregational Salaah (Prayer) in one place under the leadership of multiple Imams (those persons who lead congregational Prayer). This means assigning three Imaams, for example, for three times of Salaat-ul-`Eed; one to lead the first Salaah, another to lead the second Salaah one hour later, and the third to lead the third Salaah one hour after the second. Referring to the book of Al-Mughnee and other Fiqh (Islaamic jurisprudence) books, I could not find a single opinion of scholars on the permissibility of repeating the congregational Salaah unless one makes up for a missed Salaah (kindly, refer to Al-Mughnee, vol. 2, p. 390). I know no classic Fiqh scholar whatsoever who viewed the permissibility of organizing the performance of congregational Salaah, such as Salat-ul-`Eed, by repeating it in one place under the leadership of multiple Imaams. Please, bear in mind that it is impossible to provide a safe Musalla (place for Prayer) outside or inside the city. Moreover, I was informed that Muslims in non-Muslim cities as London repeat the congregational Salah three times or more in one place. Please, inform me about the preponderant opinion.

Answer:  It is impermissible to repeat the performance of Salaat-ul-`Eed in consecutive congregations as this is a newly-invented practice (in Islaam). In this regard, the Prophet (peace be upon him) stated: Whoever introduces anything into this affair of ours (Islaam) that is not of it will have it rejected. Accordingly, every group should offer Salaat-ul-`Eed in the respective Masjid in which they offer Jumu`ah (Friday) Prayer, if it is unfeasible to provide a place in which everyone can offer Salat-ul-`Eed only once… read more here.

Praying a supererogatory Salaah before Salaat-ul-`Eed in Musalla al-`Eed

Question 13: What is the ruling on praying a supererogatory Salaah (Prayer) before Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer) held in Musalla (place for Prayer)?

Answer:  No Sunnah (supererogatory) Salaah is to be performed before Salaat-ul-`Eed. The reason is that one of the times in which it is impermissible to offer a supererogatory Salaah is the time after offering Fajr (Dawn) Prayer until the sun rises a spear’s length. Moreover, Salaat-ul-`Eed is performed in other than the Masjids (mosques) which means that there is no Tahiyyat-ul-Masjid (two-unit Prayer to salute the mosque) before Salaat-ul-`Eed held in a Musalla… read more here.

Qunoot at the last Rak`ah of the two `Eed Prayer

Question 12: Is Qunoot (supplication recited while standing after bowing in the last unit of Prayer) permissible at the last Rak`ah (unit of Prayer) of the Two `Eed Prayers?

Answer:  Qunoot is Mashroo` (Islaamically prescribed) and is only to be done in Witr (Prayer with an odd number of units), or in the Daily Obligatory Prayers in case there is a calamity. This is authentically reported in the Sunnah (whatever is reported from the Prophet of acts, sayings or approvals). Yet, Qunoot in case of calamity is permissible to be done in all the Five Obligatory Daily Prayers, and its place is to be in the standing position after Rukoo` (bowing) in the last Rak`ah (unit of Prayer). Also, the narrations from the Prophet (peace be upon him) tell us that he used to do Qunoot more in Fajr (Dawn) Prayer, namely Qunoot in case of calamities… read more here.

Missing the Takbeers of the Salaat-ul-`Eed or of Salaat-ul-Janaazah

Question 11: What is the ruling on missing the Takbeers (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allah is the Greatest]”) of the Janaazah (Funeral) Prayer or of Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer); should one make up for them or complete his Salaah (Prayer)?

Answer: First, If one catches up with the Imaam (the one who leads congregational Prayer) in the Janaazah Prayer after missing some of the Takbeer, they should continue with the Imaam and make up for the Takbeer they have missed and then perform Tasleem (salutation of peace ending the Prayer), considering the part they catch with the Imaam as the start of their Prayer… read more here.

Raising of hands in Takbeer of Salaat-ul-`Eed and of the Witr Prayer

Question 10: There is much disagreement in books concerning raising the hands in the extra Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) of Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer); what is the most correct opinion concerning this?

Should the hands be raised when saying the Du`aa’ (supplication) of the Witr (Prayer with an odd number of units): “Allaahumma ihdinee feeman hadayta…(O Allaah! Guide me among those You have guided…)”? What is the most authentic opinion reported from the Prophet (peace be upon him) in this regard?

Answer: Raising the hands in Takbeeraat-ul-Ihraam (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allah is the Greatest]” upon starting Prayer) and the extra Takbeer of Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer) and the Janaazah (Funeral) Prayer is Sunnah (supererogatory act of worship following the example of the Prophet) and not obligatory. A Muslim is rewarded for doing it and not punished or rebuked for giving up. Whoever does not observe it should be informed that it is Sunnah without being made to feel duty-bound to do it… read more here.

Raising the hands in the extra Takbeer of Salaat-ul-`Eed

Question 9: There is much disagreement in books concerning raising the hands in the extra Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) of Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer). What is the strongest opinion concerning this?

Answer: Raising hands while performing the extra Takbeer of Salaat-ul-`Eed is Mustahab (desirable). Whoever does it will be rewarded, but will not be punished for giving it up. Waa’il ibn Hujr said: The Prophet (peace be upon him) would raise his hands with Takbeer. The same applies to the Takbeer of the Janaazah (Funeral) Prayer… read more here.

The Takbeer of the two `Eed Prayers

Question 8: When we pronounce the seven and the five Takbeers (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allah is the Greatest]”) while praying the two Eed (feast) prayers, does the Imaam (the one who leads congregational Prayer) pronounce Takbeer first and then the Ma’moom (person being led by an Imaam in Prayer) repeat after him, or is the Takbeer to be made only by the Imaam? Also, what should be said between each two Takbeers?

Answer: The Takbeer (saying: ”Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) of the Eed Prayer in the first Rak’ah (unit of prayer) is to be made seven times, including Takbeeraat-ul-Ihraam (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]” upon starting Prayer) and in the second Rak’ah there are only five Takbeers after the takbeer for standing up from Sujood for the Imaam and Ma’moom in general. Both the Imaam and Ma’moom raise their hands with every Takbeer (saying: ”Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) and the Takbeer (saying: ”Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) of Ma’moom is to be made after the Takbeer of the Imam… read more here.

Reciting some sections of the Qur’aan before the two `Eed Prayers and making Takbeer during intervals

Question 7: Is it a Sunnah (action following the example of the Prophet Muhammad) to recite some sections of the Noble Qur’aan before the Two `Eed Prayers and make Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) between the sections or not? Kindly advise us on this matter, may Allaah bless you!

Answer: It is recommended for worshippers to occupy themselves with Takbeer during the Eed Day until the sermon comes to an end following the example of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and his companions. However, if you recite the Noble Qur’aan before Salaah (Prayer), there is nothing wrong with doing so.  read more here.

Ruling if the beginning of the month of Shawwaal was not known until Zawaal on the `Eed Day?

Question 6: What is the ruling if the beginning of the month of Shawwaal was not known until afternoon on the Eed (feast) Day?

Answer: If people have not known the beginning of the Eed (feast) until after the afternoon, they are to break the fast for that day and offer Eed (feast) Salaah (Prayer) in the morning of the following day. When the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) was informed of the appearance of the crescent at the end of the day that was counted as the last day of Ramadaan, he ordered people to break their fast of that day and to come out to celebrate their Eed (feast) in the following day. Recorded by Ahmad, Aboo Daawood Al-Daaraqootnee  read more here.

Eed-ul-Ad-haa is the tenth day of the month of Thul-Hijjah

Question 5: Do we celebrate `Eed Al-Ad-haa (the Festival of the Sacrifice) on the tenth day of Thul-Hijjah?

Answer: `Eed Al-Ad-haa (the Festival of the Sacrifice) is actually celebrated on the tenth day of Thul-Hijjah. All Muslims have unanimously agreed upon this. During this `Eed, it is prescribed to offer Salaat-ul-`Eed (the Festival Prayer) as two Rak`ahs (units of Prayer) after the sun rises in the sky to the height of a spear, then draw near to Allaah by slaughtering Ud-hiyahs (sacrificial animals offered by non-pilgrims) after the prayer and distributing some of their meat in charity to the needy. You should increase Thikr (Remembrance of Allaah) and Takbeer (saying: “Allaahu Akbar [Allaah is the Greatest]”) and give thanks to Allaah for His Blessings, especially the blessings of Islaam and being guided by the Sunnah of Prophet Muhammad ibn ‘Abdullaah (peace be upon him)… read more here.

General Takbeer at `Eed Al-Ad-haa

Question 13:  What is your opinion regarding offering general Takbeer at `Eed Al-Ad-haa? Does it continue until the thirteenth day of Thul-Hijjah? Is there any difference between a person who is performing Hajj and a person who is not?

Answer: One should continue offering general Takbeer until the end of the thirteenth day of Thul-Hijjah. There is no difference in this regard between a person who is performing Hajj and others. Allaah (Exalted be He) says: …and mention the Name of Allaah on appointed days (i.e. 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th day of Thul-Hijjah) and And remember Allaah during the appointed Days. Al-Bukhaaree reported that Ibn `Abbaas said: “Al-Ayyaam Al-Ma`loomaat (appointed days) are the first ten days of Thul-Hijjah and Al-Ayyaam Al-Ma`doodaat (appointed days) are 11th, 12th and 13th day of Thul-Hijjah.” Al-Bukhaaree also said that Ibn `Umar and Aboo Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with them both) used to go to the market in the first ten days of Thul-Hijjah in order to offer Takbeer. People used to follow their example in offering Takbeer... read more here.