Granting the nationality of a Muslim country to a non-Muslim

Question: What is the ruling on granting the nationality of a Muslim country to a non-Muslim?

Answer: It is permissible to grant a non-Muslim the nationality of a Muslim country provided that the danger of Fitnah (sedition) is secured and that his good intentions are sensed… read more here.

Advertisements

Trade Partnerships with non-Muslims

Question: We live in Australia, a country that clearly admits its secular identity that secures freedom of religion and atheism; nevertheless, the broadcast media, whether television or radio, is clothed in the garb of Judo-Christian values. A simple observer can easily see this. The proportion of Muslims to other inhabitants of the country is one to thirty two. We, as Muslims, sometimes have to go to their centers, their places of worship, and attend funerals of friends or officials, and similar cases needed due to work conditions and responsibilities. Sometimes, a non-Muslim may come to our houses and eat with us. Sometimes, they ask us to allow them to see inside our Masjids (mosques) and enter them.(Of course, while respecting the Islaamic relevant etiquette, like their taking off their shoes or wearing head scarves by women). So what is the ruling of Sharee‘ah (Islaamic law) on the following:

1- Entering a non-Muslim’s house.
2- Attending their religious ceremonies.
3- Entering into trade partnership with them.
4- Entertaining them.
5- Their coming to our places of worship.
6- May they deliver speeches in our Masjids?
7- May they deliver a speech in our celebrations in the lecture room outside the Masjid?
8- Is it permissible for us to meet them ( Jews or Christians) in general gatherings organized by the Australian state or any of the governmental institutions where each party delivers a speech on religious issues like (Peace in Religions), (Mercy in Religions), (The Meaning of Worship in Religions) etc.?

Answer: Firstly, it is permissible to go to the non-Muslims’ houses to reconcile their hearts, advise, and guide them and for similar good purposes, but not out of closeness and alliance… read more here.

Ruling on spending the night in the house of a Mushrik

Question: Is it permissible to spend the night in the house of a Mushrik (the one who associates others with Allaah in His Divinity) from among those who glorify shrines and sacrifice for other than Allaah?

Answer: It is not permissible to spend the night in the house of a Mushrik from among those who glorify shrines and sacrifice for anyone other than Allaah… read more here.

Muslims and non-Muslims exchanging visits

Question: In the area where we work, there are some Arab Christians who sometimes invite us to visit them. Is it permissible for us to visit them and invite them to visit us?

Answer: If your intention of visiting is to advise and invite them to Islaam, then inviting to Islaam is a noble aim. Therefore, your invitation and visit at their houses is a means to realize this noble objective; the means are judged the same as their objectives… read more here.

Ruling on visiting relatives who love disbelievers

Question: Is it permissible to visit relatives who love disbelievers?

Answer: It is permissible to visit such relatives on condition that the person visiting them advises and instructs them to stop their love of disbelievers. To do so, one is encouraged to make clear to them the meaning of the principle of Al-Walaa’ wal-Baraa’ (loyalty to Muslims and disassociation from non-Muslims for Allaah’s Sake) so that they might be aware of what is lawful and what is prohibited thereof and that they might give up this evil deed… read more here.

Dealing with a Dhimmee (protected non-Muslim living under Islaamic rule)

Question: What is the ideal way to deal with a Dhimmee? Should they be dealt with in the normal way?

Answer: The ideal way for Muslims when dealing with a Dhimmee is to honor the agreement made with them according to the Aayaat (Qur’aanic verses) and Hadeeth that command the fulfillment of agreements and dealing kindly and justly with them. Allaah (Exalted be He) says… read more here.